Cherry blossoms . . . (a haiku)

 

 

Golden Haiku Third Place Winner

 

In Washington, DC, the winners and runners up of the Golden Triangle Haiku Competition are displayed in individual signs on downtown streets. Mine placed third out of over 1,675 entries from 45 countries and 34 states, and the District of Columbia. This was quite a nice surprise for me. This year’s contest theme was “Spring in the City.”

 

Here is a press release giving background of this competition:

https://goldentriangledc.com/news/golden-triangle-in-washington-d-c-announces-2018-golden-haiku-winners/

Use this link to read all the haiku that are now on signs on Washington DC streets.

https://3al7vg3hahkr4er97p13jo9w-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Golden-Haiku-2018-Signs.pdf

 

Photo by Theodor Horydcz, Tidal Basin with Cherry Blossoms, Washington, DC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not mine, but this is an example of how all the haiku are displayed in the Farragut Square area of Washington, DC

 

 

Flying against the wind

The poem, “Flying Against the Wind” is the final poem in my chapbook, Erasing the Doubt, (c) 2015,  Finishing Line Press. (The book is available for purchase from Finishing Line Press.)

 

 

Flying Against the Wind

 

Your thoughts drifted out to sea—riding on the wind

like wisps of breath lost on a freezing day.

.
With only the lighthouse for company and water all around,

your steady feet were planted firmly on the point.

You looked as if you were an island isolated from the world,

but you were not.

 

The chill March air made even you feel cold.

You pulled the flapping wings of your jacket closed,

zipped it, and slid your hands deep inside the pockets.

Except for this, you never moved.

 

You stood there looking at the sea that went on forever,

searching the horizon for clues where it might end.

The wind stung your eyes as waves conjured up whitecaps,

then swept them away like mermaids lost and turned to foam

while currents pulled together and then apart.

 

A fierce gust blew through your bones, trying to topple you,

but you stood fast. Even sea birds hid behind steep cliffs,

not daring to fly against the wind.

 

waves

“Arai: Whitecaps on the Ocean (Arai—Enkai hato),” c. 1848-1849, by Utagawa Hiroshige I