Sipping skinny lattés

 

Prune Juice, Journal of Senryu, Kyoka, Haibun & Haiga, Issue, 24, Spring 2018:

two senryu and one kyoka published

 

 

 

pulling a single

strand of silken thread …

her undoing

 

              …

 

sipping skinny lattés

they march against

world hunger

 

              …

 

a slight limp

on cold and rainy days

how easy it is

to fall out of step

with myself

 

 

orb weaver Robert Potts:Getty Images

Orb Weaver Web / Photo by Robert Potts/Getty Images

 

 

Noon… (a haiga)

 

 

 

 

 

Published in Prune Juice, Journal of Senryu, Kyoka, Haibun & Haiga, Issue, 24, Spring 2018

 

 

Notes from other lives… (two tanka)

 

Gusts, no. 27, Contemporary Tanka (Canada)
spring/summer 2018

 

 

heart fluttering

and eyes closed tight –

it was as if you knew

the swallows had flown

away again

 

 

 

 

shipwreck spoils

wash back and forth

upon the tide –

notes from other lives

left in sea glass shards

 

 

Both tanka (c) 2018, Mary Kendall

Flying against the wind

The poem, “Flying Against the Wind” is the final poem in my chapbook, Erasing the Doubt, (c) 2015,  Finishing Line Press. (The book is available for purchase from Finishing Line Press.)

 

 

Flying Against the Wind

 

Your thoughts drifted out to sea—riding on the wind

like wisps of breath lost on a freezing day.

.
With only the lighthouse for company and water all around,

your steady feet were planted firmly on the point.

You looked as if you were an island isolated from the world,

but you were not.

 

The chill March air made even you feel cold.

You pulled the flapping wings of your jacket closed,

zipped it, and slid your hands deep inside the pockets.

Except for this, you never moved.

 

You stood there looking at the sea that went on forever,

searching the horizon for clues where it might end.

The wind stung your eyes as waves conjured up whitecaps,

then swept them away like mermaids lost and turned to foam

while currents pulled together and then apart.

 

A fierce gust blew through your bones, trying to topple you,

but you stood fast. Even sea birds hid behind steep cliffs,

not daring to fly against the wind.

 

waves

“Arai: Whitecaps on the Ocean (Arai—Enkai hato),” c. 1848-1849, by Utagawa Hiroshige I

Reckoning . . .

 

Gusts fall 2017 no 1

 

 

owl close up

Note: This beautiful owl drawing appears on Pinterest, but I was unable to trace it to a specific artist. I am grateful to the unknown artist for putting this lovely piece ‘out there’ for others to view and use.

Spent blossoms . . . (honorable mention)

Sakura flower or cherry blossoms in Japan.

 

Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival
2017 Haiku Invitational Winners

 USA
Honourable Mentions

 

 

spent blossoms—

the remission, too,

was unexpected

.
                          Mary Kendall
                         Chapel Hill, North Carolina

 

 

To view all the winners and honorable mentions, please click on this link to go to the official website:

http://www.vcbf.ca/haiku-invitational/winning-haiku/2017-winning-haiku

Note: The beautiful picture of cherry blossoms (above) is taken from the website, Flower Meaning (http://www.flowermeaning.com). Also, from this website:

What is the Sakura Flower?

While the Japanese called this flower the sakura, you likely know it as the cherry blossom instead. The blossom of the Japanese Cherry, also known as the Prunus serrulata, is technically the sakura flower. However, other varieties of blooming cherries are also grown in Japan and referred to with the same name. The cherry blossom became so popular in the Heian era of Japan’s history that the word for flower became synonymous with sakura. People have been picnicking under the blooming trees since 700 A.D., a tradition that continues today.

 

The beautiful and very short lived cherry blossoms symbolize the brevity of life. The kanji (above) is for Sakura or cherry blossom. I think the kanji is just as beautiful by itself as is a single cherry blossom.

Water haiku (three poems)

The September issue of Brass Bell, curated by Zee Zehava, had a prompt/theme of “water.” I was fortunate to have three haiku selected for publication (two one liners and one traditional three line haiku). I hope you will visit the site for Brass Bell and enjoy all the excellent haiku written to this theme. The link is given below.

 

her waters broken the beginning of the beginning

 

 

what was hidden now emerges water lillies

 

 

near the cattails —
two white egrets
lost in reflection

 

Marsh Bird Looking Little Egret Head Portrait

Photograph by Max Pixel http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com

 

Note: These haiku were published in the September (2017) issue of Brass Bell, a haiku journal. The poet is Mary Kendall (c) 2017.

Link to the journal:  http://brassbellhaiku.blogspot.com