burning anger

Moonbathing, Issue 23, Fall/Winter 2020

 

 

hot roasted nuts

heaped into a paper cone –

all that burning anger

you hold onto

so tightly

 

 

 

 

Photograph by Monika Topolko

As an aside, I am realizing my age is showing. Do young people today even know about folks roasting chestnuts (or other nuts) and buying a brown paper cone full of piping hot nuts to eat on the street? I first came across this in Istanbul when I was young. The scent, heat, taste on a chilly autumn afternoon was one of those moments that has stayed with me all my life. Europeans had this custom, but does anyone still do this? The fragrance was so tempting.

 

 

Chekov’s birch trees (haiku)

Presence,

Issue 68, November 2020

sleepless nights

     Chekhov’s birch trees

become our woods

Photo by Peng Chen on Unsplash

My thanks to Peng Chen for this beautiful photograph of white birch trees.

We turn away…(tanka)

 

This tanka was published in Hedgerow, a journal of small poems ~ #130, Winter 2020

 

 

we turn away

from all we just can’t face—

the glistening red

of a vulture’s head

emerges from a carcass

 

 

 

Poet’s note:

Out of decay comes art and beauty. Look what artist Georgia O’Keefe created from a skull found where she lived in New Mexico. All is part of nature and is nature.

 

Deer’s Skull with Pedernal by Georgia O’Keefe (c) 1936

 

Where I live in central North Carolina, we have plenty of black vultures and turkey vultures. They circle and gather in the sky when there is carrion to be had. I chose this topic for the tanka because it’s a scene I’ve seen more than once. Yes, it’s not a pretty sight. Vultures, especially when eating a dead animal or gathering in a group in a tree or abandoned house do give you shivers. Something in us seems to respond with at least a momentary revulsion. However, I’m a bird lover and I try to see how a specific species fits into the scheme of things. Vultures and crows do eat carrion, the flesh of dead animals, often of roadkill along our roads and streets. They perform a good service by eating their meal and cleaning the mess up. Imagine all those dead animals left to rot. So these birds help us as they go about their business (albeit unpleasant business to us). They are birds we should appreciate for their useful role in nature. They also offer us a wonderful metaphor.

My thanks to editor, Caroline Skanne for being the one editor who chose to publish this poem. 

innocence . ..

 


This tanka is dedicated it to all who have dealt with the trauma
of childhood sexual abuse.

 

 

 

he believed

himself omnipotent…

the innocence

of so many children

dissolved in a moment

 

 

 

Photograph by Circe Denyer

Eucalypt: A Tanka Journal,
Issue 25, 2018

It’s a great honor to have had this tanka published in Eucalypt. My thanks to editor, Julie Anne Thorndyke for selecting this particular poem.

 

 

.

As if on cue . . . (Senryu/Tankart)

 

Painted in Waterlogue

 

Published:  Failed Haiku, a Journal of English Senryu, Volume 3, Issue 31,
July 2018

Guest editors: Lori A. Minor and Chase Gagnon
Primary editor: Michael Rehling

 

 

Note: I’d like to thank my dear friend, Christine M. Kalke for her permission to use her beautiful photograph that was taken in Scandinavia during one of her visits. The digital art work was done by me.